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Cold Calling and Classroom Discussions

Cold Calling and Classroom Discussions

The researchers found that when there were low levels of cold calling in a class, men tended to participate voluntarily more than women. When cold calling was frequently used within a class, students, both men and women, volunteered to participate more often. Further, the increase was larger for the women students than the men students.…
How Does Retrieval Improve New Learning?

How Does Retrieval Improve New Learning?

Cover image by Dharmendra Rai from PixabayBy Althea Need KaminskeWhile we talk about the benefits of retrieval practice a lot here at the Learning Scientists, we usually talk about the benefits of retrieval practice for already learned information. However, retrieval practice has also been shown to be beneficial for learning new information. That is, retrieving…
Yerkes-Dodson: Lore, not Law

Yerkes-Dodson: Lore, not Law

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References:(1)    Yerkes, R.M., and Dodson, J.D. (1908). The relation of strength of stimulus to rapidity of habit formation. Journal of Comparative Neurology of Psychology, 18(5), 459-482.(2)    Diamond D.M., et al. (2007). The Temporal Dynamics Model of Emotional Memory Processing: A Synthesis on the Neurobiological Basis of Stress-Induced Amnesia, Flashbulb and Traumatic Memories, and the Yerkes-Dodson…
Questions in Class, Covert Retrieval, and Cold Calling

Questions in Class, Covert Retrieval, and Cold Calling

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By Megan SumerackiCover image by 정수 이 from PixabayIn a previous blog post about retrieval practice, Cindy asked, is asking questions in class enough? She covered an experiment by Magdalena Abel and Henry Roediger (1) in which students studied Swahili vocabulary in a few different conditions. In one of those conditions, students graded another student’s…
Improving Self-Regulated Learning

Improving Self-Regulated Learning

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By Althea Need Kaminskecover image by StockSnap by PixabaySelf-regulated learning describes a cyclical process of forethought, performance, and self-reflection that enables a learner to regulate, and thereby improve, their learning (1). Previously, I’ve reviewed research on the relationship between self-regulated learning and personality, Carolina provided a digest on fostering self-regulated learning in students, and she…
Spaced Practice and Working Memory

Spaced Practice and Working Memory

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If you need another reason to love spaced practice, Ouhao Chen and colleagues (1) provide yet another one. They conducted two experiments to investigate the relationship between spaced practice and working memory depletion. First, I’ll provide a primer on working memory and resource depletion, and then I’ll describe the experiments and results.Working memory is the…
When Restudying Trumps Retrieval

When Restudying Trumps Retrieval

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by Cindy Nebel(Cover image from Pixabay by squarefrog.)We have so many blogs about retrieval practice. In fact, it is the most common tag we use on our blog. If you’re new to this conversation, you can find some summary information about the benefits of retrieval practice here and some additional resources here. In short, there…
Pitting Learning Styles Against Dual Coding

Pitting Learning Styles Against Dual Coding

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By Megan SumerackiWhen creating content and materials for the Learning Scientists website, we try to include many different types of forms (NOT because of Learning Styles, but because of preferences, and diversity in the type of media an individual can consume!). To that end, I’ve created blog versions of some bite-size research podcast episodes in…
Mary Whiton Calkins

Mary Whiton Calkins

by Althea Need KaminskeIn the past month I’ve been thinking a lot about history. I was tasked with writing a brief overview of cognitive psychology for a book I’m writing with Megan, and someone wrote into the Learning Scientists interested in the history of learning and asking for some places to start. I was not…
GUEST POST: Let’s focus on ‘Learning’ in MicroLearning

GUEST POST: Let’s focus on ‘Learning’ in MicroLearning

Valuable Content: This is the ‘what’ of the microlesson – the actual topic. Instructors should ask themselves – what is it I want to teach my learners with a particular microlesson? Content should be relevant and useful, and it should be a part of something that will connect to learners’ existing knowledge. Content is a…
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