Word of the Day: kaleidoscopic

0
77
Word of the Day: kaleidoscopic

The word kaleidoscopic has appeared in 74 articles on NYTimes.com in the past year, including on Feb. 16 in “New Auroras Found Glowing in the Skies of Jupiter’s Moons” by Robin George Andrews:

A sightseeing alien touring our solar system would do well to check out the emerald and blood orange-red ribbons of Earth’s auroras. But our world isn’t the only one with spectacular light shows in its atmosphere. New research shows auroras can also be seen on the Galilean moons of Jupiter: hypervolcanic Io, icy Europa, quirky Callisto and gigantic Ganymede.

… Confounding chemistries aside, any astronaut photographing these Galilean glows — backgrounded by tempestuous Jupiter and the gas giant’s own kaleidoscopic auroras — would capture a memorable sight. Above all else, these studies demonstrate that beauty is not unique to Earth. If we are willing to search for it, enchanting scenes can be found anywhere in the cosmos.

Can you correctly use the word kaleidoscopic in a sentence?

Based on the definition and example provided, write a sentence using today’s Word of the Day and share it as a comment on this article. It is most important that your sentence makes sense and demonstrates that you understand the word’s definition, but we also encourage you to be creative and have fun.

Then, read some of the other sentences students have submitted and use the “Recommend” button to vote for two original sentences that stand out to you.

If you want a better idea of how kaleidoscopic can be used in a sentence, read these usage examples on Vocabulary.com.


Students ages 13 and older in the United States and the United Kingdom, and 16 and older elsewhere, can comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff.

The Word of the Day is provided by Vocabulary.com. Learn more and see usage examples across a range of subjects in the Vocabulary.com Dictionary. See every Word of the Day in this column.