GUEST POST: COVID-19 and the Shift to Online Learning

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GUEST POST: COVID-19 and the Shift to Online Learning

References:

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(2)   Xu, D., & Jaggars, S. (2013). Adaptability to online learning: Differences across types of students and academic subject areas. Community College Research Center, Teachers College, Columbia University. Retrieved from https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/doi/10.7916/D82N59NB.

(3)   Bambara, C. S., Harbour, C. P., Davies, T. G., & Athey, S. (2009). Delicate engagement: The lived experience of community college students enrolled in high-risk online courses. Community College Review, 36(3), 219-238.

(4)   Rasheed, R. A., Kamsin, A., & Abdullah, N. A. (2020). Challenges in the online component of blended learning: A systematic review. Computers & Education, 144, 103701.

(5)   Kebritchi, M., Lipschuetz, A., & Santiague, L. (2017). Issues and Challenges for Teaching Successful Online Courses in Higher Education: A Literature Review. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 46(1), 4–29..

(6)   Lee, J. (2020). A Psychological Exploration of Zoom Fatigue. Psychiatric Times. Online publication retrieved from https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/psychological-exploration-zoom-fatigue.

(7)   Bolliger, D. U., & Halupa, C. (2018). Online student perceptions of engagement, transactional distance, and outcomes. Distance Education, 39(3), 299-316.

(8)   Figlio, D. N., Rush, M., & Yin, L. (2010). Is it live or is it internet? Experimental Estimates of the Effects of Online Instruction on Student Learning. Journal of Labour Economics, 31(16089).

(9)   Cavanaugh, J. K., & Jacquemin, S. J. (2015). A large sample comparison of grade based student learning outcomes in online vs. face-to-face courses. Online Learning, 19(2).