What’s Going On in This Graph? | Nov. 13, 2019

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What’s Going On in This Graph? | Nov. 13, 2019

This graph originally appeared elsewhere on NYTimes.com. By Friday morning, Nov. 15, we will provide the “Reveal” — the graph’s free online link, additional background and questions, shout-outs highlighting student comments and headlines, and Stat Nuggets.

To add other relevant information to your analysis, you may want to use the graph below to compare the prior experience of our presidents to the experience of 2020 Democratic candidates.

After looking closely at the graphs above (or at this full-size image), think about these three questions:

  • What do you notice? If you make a claim, tell us what you noticed that supports your claim.

  • What do you wonder? What are you curious about that comes from what you notice in the graph?

The questions are intended to build on one another, so try to answer them in order. Start with “I notice,” then “I wonder,” and end with a catchy headline.

2. Next, join the conversation by clicking on the comment button and posting in the box that opens on the right. (Students 13 and older are invited to comment online. Teachers of younger students are welcome to post what their students’ comments.)

3. After you have posted, read what others have said, then respond to someone else by posting a comment. Use the “Reply” button or the @ symbol to address that student directly.

On Wednesday, Nov. 13, our collaborator, the American Statistical Association, will facilitate this discussion from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern time to help students’ understanding go deeper. You might use their responses as models for your own.

4. By Friday morning, we will reveal more information about the graph at the bottom of this post. Students, we encourage you to post an additional comment after reading the reveal. How does the original article and the moderators’ comments help you see the graph differently? Try to incorporate the statistical terms defined in the Stat Nuggets in your response.